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POV Project: P&P: Chapter Two

(1)  Mr Bennet was among the earliest of those who waited on Mr Bingley.

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Exposition.)

(2)  He had always intended to visit him, though to the last always assuring his wife that he should not go; and till the evening after the visit was paid she had no knowledge of it.

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Introspection/Exposition.)  The first half could be Mr Bennet, though is probably not, but the last half is plainly not - only the ON could so easily assert what Mrs Bennet does not know.

(3)  It was then disclosed in the following manner.

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Action.)

(4)  Observing his second daughter employed in trimming a hat, he suddenly addressed her with,— ‘I hope Mr Bingley will like it, Lizzy.’

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Action.  Dialogue.)  I originally pegged this as Mr Bennet, but no second thought, there's no trace of his voice outside of the dialogue itself; the neutral, authoritarian voice is much more akin to the ON.

(5)  ‘We are not in a way to know what Mr Bingley likes,’ said her mother, resentfully, ‘since we are not to visit.’

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(6)  ‘But you forget, Mama,’ said Elizabeth, ‘that we shall meet him at the assemblies, and that Mrs Long has promised to introduce him.’

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(7)  ‘I do not believe Mrs Long will do any such thing. She has two nieces of her own. She is a selfish, hypocritical woman, and I have no opinion of her.’

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(8)  ‘No more have I,’ said Mr Bennet; ‘and I am glad to find that you do not depend on her serving you.’

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(9)  Mrs Bennet deigned not to make any reply; but, unable to contain herself, began scolding one of her daughters.

POV:  Mrs Bennet.  (Action/Introspection.)

(10)  ‘Don’t keep coughing so, Kitty, for heaven’s sake! Have a little compassion on my nerves. You tear them to pieces.’

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(11)  ‘Kitty has no discretion in her coughs,’ said her father; ‘she times them ill.’

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(12)  ‘I do not cough for my own amusement,’ replied Kitty, fretfully.

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(13)  ‘When is your next ball to be, Lizzy?’

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(14)  ‘To-morrow fortnight.’

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(15)  ‘Ay, so it is,’ cried her mother, ‘and Mrs Long does not come back till the day before; so, it will be impossible for her to introduce him, for she will not know him herself.’

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(16)  ‘Then, my dear, you may have the advantage of your friend, and introduce Mr Bingley to her.'

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(17)  ‘Impossible, Mr Bennet, impossible, when I am not acquainted with him myself; how can you be so teasing?’

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(18)  ‘I honour your circumspection.

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(19)  A fortnight’s acquaintance is certainly very little.

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(20)  One cannot know what a man really is by the end of a fortnight.

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(21)  But if we do not venture, somebody else will; and after all, Mrs Long and her nieces must stand their chance; and, therefore, as she will think it an act of kindness, if you decline the office, I will take it on myself.’

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(22)  The girls stared at their father.

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Action.)

(23)  Mrs Bennet said only, ‘Nonsense, nonsense!’

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(24)  ‘What can be the meaning of that emphatic exclamation?’ cried he.

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(25)  ‘Do you consider the forms of introduction, and the stress that is laid on them, as nonsense?

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(26)  I cannot quite agree with you there.

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(27)  What say you, Mary? for you are a young lady of deep reflection, I know, and read great books, and make extracts.’

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(28)  Mary wished to say something very sensible, but knew not how.

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Introspection.)  Like #4, I originally considered this as Mary, but on further thought, it seems to be filtered through the ON's consciousness; the last clause, particularly, seems to imply a degree of absolute knowledge.

(29)  ‘While Mary is adjusting her ideas,’ he continued, ‘let us return to Mr Bingley.’

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(30)  ‘I am sick of Mr Bingley,’ cried his wife.

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(31)  ‘I am sorry to hear that; but why did not you tell me so before?

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(32)  If I had known as much this morning, I certainly would not have called on him.

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(33)  It is very unlucky; but as I have actually paid the visit, we cannot escape the acquaintance now.’

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(34)  The astonishment of the ladies was just what he wished; that of Mrs Bennet perhaps surpassing the rest; though when the first tumult of joy was over, she began to declare that it was what she had expected all the while.

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Introspection/Summary.)  Again, I'm revised my first opinion on this.  The "voice" seems more akin to a third party impartially relating the experiences of others, than those people speaking on their own behalf.

(35)  ‘How good it was in you, my dear Mr Bennet.

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(36)  But I knew I should persuade you at last.

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(37)  I was sure you loved your girls too well to neglect such an acquaintance.

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(38)  Well, how pleased I am! and it is such a good joke, too, that you should have gone this morning, and never said a word about it till now.’

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(39)  ‘Now, Kitty, you may cough as much as you choose,’ said Mr Bennet; and as he spoke, he left the room, fatigued with the raptures of his wife.

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue/Action/Introspection.)  And, yet again, Mr Bennet seems unlikely to express himself in this particular way.

(40)  ‘What an excellent father you have, girls,’ said she, when the door was shut.

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue/Exposition.)

(41)  ‘I do not know how you will ever make him amends for his kindness; or me either, for that matter.

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(42)  At our time of life, it is not so pleasant, I can tell you, to be making new acquaintance every day; but for your sakes we would do anything.

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(43)  Lydia, my love, though you are the youngest, I daresay Mr. Bingley will dance with you at the next ball.’

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(44)  ‘Oh,’ said Lydia, stoutly, ‘I am not afraid; for though I am the youngest, I’m the tallest.’

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Dialogue.)

(45)  The rest of the evening was spent in conjecturing how soon he would return Mr Bennet’s visit, and determining when they should ask him to dinner.

POV:  Omniscient narrator.  (Summary.)

Comments

( 6 comments — Leave a comment )
hlbr
Mar. 25th, 2009 05:55 am (UTC)
I'm afraid you will not get this sucker to take that bet. lol
I see nothing objectionable except perhaps that here:

(2)He had always intended to visit him, though to the last always assuring his wife that he should not go; and till the evening after the visit was paid she had no knowledge of it.

I would not say that the first part is clearly Mr. Bennet's. We've just spoken about it, but I would be more reserved in making the point. idk. Perhaps I'm having trouble identifying ON exposition with the character's pov. The more I think about it, more doubt I have as to how I would difference it in a free style piece.

I said it before and I will repeat it, 3th person limited is sooo much easier. >_>
ali972
Mar. 25th, 2009 10:20 pm (UTC)
Re: I'm afraid you will not get this sucker to take that bet. lol
I'm a little sketchy on that one, too, Hele. *Flashback to long ago English/literature classes and shakes head* I'm not completely sure of this one either:

34) The astonishment of the ladies was just what he wished; that of Mrs Bennet perhaps surpassing the rest; though when the first tumult of joy was over, she began to declare that it was what she had expected all the while.

POV: Mr Bennet. (Introspection/Summary.)

My mind begins to break down when we get Mrs. Bennet thrown in there. I think there may be a little ON in this one, too. idk

The scary thing is that I think these are the easy chapters *bangs head*



*Scratches head*
hlbr
Mar. 26th, 2009 12:31 am (UTC)
Re: I'm afraid you will not get this sucker to take that bet. lol
I didn't even saw this themes officially, so I'm flying blind, but let me see 34.

We can consider 'The astonishment of the ladies was just what he wished; that of Mrs Bennet perhaps surpassing the rest; ' Mr. Bennet's pov, no? Mrs. Bennet's astonishment is named only referencing what he wished.

Now, the second part just related what happens. 'though when the first tumult of joy was over, she began to declare that it was what she had expected all the while.'

You could be right that it's the ON, as it has no mark of Mr. Bennet's opinion on it, it's just a objective relation of the events. But also, making it Mr. Bennet (for the phrase's sake--as the first part seems his pov) perhaps makes it simpler?

You know, I'm doing the Assembly chapter, and I'm struggling on a lot of phrases.
elizabethtilney
Mar. 25th, 2009 10:48 pm (UTC)
Heh.
You're quite right, Hele - I meant that we're clearly being told what was going on inside Mr Bennet's head, but of course there's this frightfully difficult distinction between 'ON telling us what Character X is thinking' and the direct path, as it were, to X's thoughts.

Originally, these were all straight ON. Then I thought about it again. eg, 'Mary wanted to say something very sensible' - it could be the ON on Mary, and probably is, but it could also be a straightforward representation of her thoughts. Is the 'knew not how' Mary's own voice, or the ON being snide? (Knowing the ON, I'm inclined to at least credit the latter.) I'll have to think about the questionable ones some more.

That sentence, now that I re-read it, seems oddly neutral for Mr Bennet. I'm not sure if it's really his voice, and I'm starting to think voice is how we'll have to distinguish, especially as we get further into it.
hlbr
Mar. 26th, 2009 12:33 am (UTC)
Re: Heh.
Voice then. I was starting to have a basic doubt: why is not everything the ON, if it knows everything everyone is thinking on top of what happens?

But voice... that I can manage. I think. \o/
ali972
Mar. 26th, 2009 12:57 am (UTC)
Re: Heh.
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<<That sentence, now that I re-read it, seems oddly neutral for Mr Bennet. I'm not sure if it's really his voice, >>

You said it better than me, E. It just sounds a little more ON than Mr B *shrugs*
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